I just recently by accident spilled bleach on my new black hoodie. Is there any way to get the color back?

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How many times do blue jeans shrink, if you continue to wash or dry in hot temperature?

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How Do I Remove a Black Stain From My Shirt?

Q: I have a black stain on my golf shirt where it touches my belt. 

A: The color that rubbed off your belt and onto your shirt can probably be removed by pretreating the stain first before washing.  What you use to pretreat depends on what color the shirt is and what fabric the shirt is made of.  If it’s white, and does not contain any spandex (also called Lycra and Elastane—check the care label to be sure) then you can use Clorox Bleach Pen Gel to pretreat the stain prior to washing it.

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Posted by Dr Laundry

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How do you get dye out of a white shirt?

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How do I get red dye out of fabric?

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How To Wash Jeans and Help Prevent Fading

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Ink stain removal

Q: I want to learn more about ink stain removal.

 

A: In general, I recommend a two-step process for dealing with ink stains that I hope will help you.  Before you start, you need to determine the colorfastness of the item if it's not white.  (Note that you should always avoid bleaching wool, silk, mohair, leather, and spandex regardless of their color).  Many colored garments actually can be safely bleached, and you can quickly test your item to be sure.  Add 1 1/2 teaspoons Clorox® Regular-Bleach to 1/4 cup water, and apply a drop to a hidden area (inside herm or cuff) of the item.  Wait one minute, then blot dry.  No color change means the item can be safely bleached, and you can treat the stain as follows:

1.  Apply alcohol-based hand sanitizer to the stain and let it soak in for a few minutes.
2.  Wash in the hottest water allowed (check the care label) with detergent and 1/2 cup Clorox Regular-Bleach.  Allow the item to air dry and check for success.
 
If the item doesn’t pass the bleachability test, then you can use Clorox2® Stain Fighter and Color Booster as follows:

1.  Apply alcohol-based hand sanitizer to the stain and let it soak in for a few minutes.
2.  Apply Clorox2® directly to the stain, wait five minutes, then wash in the hottest water recommended on the care label with detergent + Clorox2®.  Allow the item to air dry and check for success.
 
The biggest problem with a stain like this is if the ink is super concentrated--it may require multiple treatments to get the stain out.  For white, bleachable items you can also use Clorox® Bleach Pen Gel to pre-treat an ink stain directly.  Just apply a little to the stain, rub in, and then wash immediately in hot water and detergent + 1/2 cup Clorox® Regular-Bleach.  For a super concentrated stain (especially one that's been sitting around for a while), you will likely need to repeat the treatment for complete success, so be sure to keep the item out of the dryer while you are working on it.

Another problem with ink stains is when the ink is from a gel pen or other type of permanent marker, which, as the name says, really is permanent.  These ink stains are extremely difficult, if not impossible, to remove.

Posted by Dr Laundry

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How do you remove yellow cigarette smoke stains from polyester?

Q: How do you remove the yellow stain from cigarette smoke in a polyester jersey?

A: While I don’t have any personal experience with cigarette or nicotine stains, and they aren’t part of our standard test protocol for developing or improving our products, I do hope I can share some general information about treating combination stains that will help you succeed in restoring your jersey.

Because cigarette stains include an oily component, breaking up the oil is a good place to start.  Once you pretreat or presoak to deal with the oil, then you can wash the shirt to further whiten.  I’m not sure if the “yellow look” you describe is a smallish stain or if the entire garment is affected, so let’s look at both possibilities.

For a small stain, first pretreat the stained area with a little liquid dishwashing detergent (the kind you use for hand washing dishes).  Just apply a little directly to the stain and let it soak in for 5 minutes before rinsing in a little warm water.  Now you can run the jersey through a wash cycle (see below).

Or, if the entire jersey is affected, start by presoaking the item.  The longer the presoaking time, the better, so if your jersey is white that helps because it allows you to extend the soak time.  As far as what to use for the presoak, powdered Clorox2® Stain Remover and Color Booster is a great for this—just add a scoop of the powder to 2 gallons hot water and stir to dissolve.  Fully submerge the jersey in the soaking solution for up to 8 hours (or overnight) if the jersey is white.  If it has some color, then limit the soaking time to 30 minutes.  When soaking is complete, drain the soaking solution and rinse out the jersey.

When you have finished presoaking or pretreating the stain, machine wash the jersey in the hottest water recommended on the item care label.  Fortunately, polyester fabric can be safely laundered with bleach, so If the jersey is white, then use a good detergent and ½ cup Clorox® Regular-Bleach.  If the jersey has only a small amount of color, you can try using detergent and ½ cup Clorox® Smart Seek Bleach, which is specially formulated to safely bleach mostly white items with only a little color.  And for items with more color, you can use detergent and Clorox2®.

When the wash cycle is complete, hang the jersey to air dry.  Depending on the severity of the yellowing, and the amount of build-up of the oily component of the stain, you may need to repeat the treatment.

I really hope this helps!

Posted by Dr Laundry

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